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Reigniting your passion as a Software Tester
Hannah Gopi

Reigniting your passion as a Software Tester


It takes particular skills and an understanding of the software testing world to be a great tester. One needs technical know-how, the ability to identify the top trends and of course software testing savvy. These are skills that can be learned and practised over time. However, there is one other requirement which is often lacking - passion.


As a software tester myself, having one’s name associated with software that is used to diagnose life-threatening health conditions, or to allow rural children access to classroom learning resources, is reason enough for me to love what I do and to ensure that quality is associated with my name.


So when exactly did software testing become a passionless gap for washed out developers or confused IT graduates to pass the time with? My guess is somewhere between the industry realising that software testing is a real deal and the length of time it took for the graduates to catch up. Leaving a hole that is now being filled by anyone with a testing certification.


I interview potential DVT candidates weekly, and it becomes evident to me “who's in it for the long haul”. These particular candidates seem to possess emotional maturity, conversational intelligence and an overall analytical mindset that radiates from a passionate IT Tester. They are invaluable in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment often working outside of designated titles, role specs and the boundaries of methodologies.


I write this article with the aim of pointing out to my fellow testers that we have a great purpose. To ensure that an organisation is producing quality software for real life purpose is a calling and in some cases a gift. To interpret requirements into a vision and to give YOUR stamp of approval, means that what you do is not only necessary but valuable.


It isn’t about how many test cases can be found, but how many errors can be. It isn’t about how much of the system you cover but how intelligently (interpret risk-based), you cover it.


From the way, we tie our shoelaces, sit on our chairs at the office, to the manner in which we present our findings after testing speaks to our personal brand as a tester.


At the end of the day, you are your own brand, your own business. Who isn’t passionate about their own business?


So, fellow testers, I urge you to find your inner passion and your cause. It's up to you to bring the passion back into software testing!